La Habra 16-year-old boy armed with gun wounded in police shooting

LA HABRA  A 16-year-old boy was wounded in a police shooting Monday morning in La Habra, according to authorities.

Around 9:35 a.m. officers were dispatched to the 200 block of South Monte Vista Street after being notified by a woman that her son had armed himself with a gun following a family dispute, La Habra police Sgt. Jose Rocha said.

“The caller advised that the suspect left on foot, armed with the firearm and stated that he wanted to shoot something and be on the news,” he said.

However, when police arrived, the teen had already left the area. Police found him in the 300 block of South Walnut Street where an officer shot the teen, Rocha said.

The teen fled and was later located at Knudson Street and 3rd Avenue. A handgun was recovered,  Rocha said.

He was transported by ambulance to UCI Medical Center where his condition was unknown. He is in custody on suspicion of attempted homicide, criminal threats, and brandishing a firearm.

No officers were injured.

A motive for the shooting has not been released, and the incident remains under investigation.

 

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San Clemente beaches opened, then re-closed Monday after fisherman hooks 12-foot shark from pier

Beachgoers play along the edge of the water after lifeguards closed the beach at San Clemente's Main Beach due to several great white shark sightings on Sunday, May 21, 2017.Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer
Beach-oers play along the edge of the water after lifeguards closed the beach at San Clemente’s Main Beach due to several great white shark sightings on Sunday, May 21, 2017. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

It’s been a back and forth game of open and shut for San Clemente beaches, with the waters re-opened Monday morning, May 22, then closed again after a fisherman hooked a 12-foot shark off the pier.

The ocean off Orange County’s southernmost beach was closed Sunday after about 24 great white sharks were spotted near San Clemente’s coastline and others were spotted off the pier. With at least one shark in the estimated 10-foot range, lifeguards cleared the water about 4 p.m. and decided to reassess early Monday.

Surfers and swimmers had a short time to enjoy the ocean in the early-morning hours Monday, after reports “of some really large sharks,” said Marine Safety Chief Bill Humphreys.

There were two spotted by multiple sources – one 12-footer and a 10-footer – by the end and middle of the pier about 8:15 a.m. Monday.

Sharks under 8-foot are considered to be in the juvenile range and mostly go after sting rays and small fish. But upward of that size and they start changing their diet to eat bigger marine mammals. Size is used to determine how lifeguards respond to a sighting, and whether to order strict closures rather than an advisory with “enter at your own risk” signs.

It takes heavy fishing gear to hook a large shark and “it’s something that is discouraged,” said Humphreys.

“I haven’t confirmed if they were fishing for sharks, but they did get it close to the pier. That leads me to believe they were fishing for sharks. They couldn’t do that with normal fishing gear,” he said. The shark ultimately was released.

The closure is expected to last four hours and will be modified if a new sighting occurs.

On Sunday, the closures started at about 10:30 a.m. after a sighting of an eight to nine-foot shark at the end of the San Clemente Pier. Then at 1 p.m., the department received another sighting report of a six to seven-foot shark, also off the pier. Since the second sighting was of a smaller shark, marine safety officers downgraded the closure to a warning and reopened the water for beachgoers to swim at their own risk.

But with the sheriff’s helicopter spotting about 25 sharks later in the afternoon from Cotton’s Point to Capistrano Beach – a dozen of them grouped together near North Beach – officers reestablished the closure.

Southern Orange County has been a hotbed for shark activity in recent weeks. On April 29, a woman was bit by a shark at Church surf spot at San Onofre State Beach. Days later, Orange County Sheriff’s spotted about 15 sharks while searching the area by helicopters. Drone footage of sharks lingering in the area has made national news and the reports have surfers in the area on edge. 

Experts have a number of theories on why the sharks are staying close to shore in larger numbers – including protections the past few decades for great whites and their major food source, sea lions, as well as an abundance of sting rays. El Nino-driven, warmer-than-normal water temperatures and rising sea levels may also be coming into play.

 

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Own a home or renting? 5 questions about what Trump’s tax plan could mean to you

It’s little more than bullet points on a single page.

But the effect of President Donald Trump’s plan to overhaul the U.S. tax system is being hotly debated in real estate circles.

The National Association of Realtors, citing Trump’s proposals to double the standard deduction while scrapping write-offs for expenses like state and local property taxes, warns that such a plan would hurt a wide swath of homeowners and the residential real estate market.

“It’s going to continue to make California a renter’s state vs. a homeowner’s state,” said Tammy Newland-Shishido, Orange County Association of Realtors president-elect, who was in Washington D.C., with the national advocacy group last week.

Not every real estate expert foresees dire consequences. Some say if the plan prevails in Congress, it could spread the wealth.

“It’s beneficial to the everyday person,” said Fadel Lawandy, director of the Hoag Center for Real Estate and Finance at Chapman University in Orange. “The middle class is going to benefit, whether they own a home or not. It will help renters significantly.”

Trump’s simple, one-page outline was expected to forge major changes in the tax code this year, but some Wall Street analysts believe the repeated crises faced by the White House could push tax reform into 2018.

Regardless of when it happens, here’s how arguments over what it could mean for housing are unfolding:

What’s been proposed?

Trump’s plan raises the standard deduction to $24,000 from $12,600 for a married couple filing jointly. Only deductions for only mortgages and charitable donations would be allowed. Deductions for state and local taxes, including property taxes, and other write-offs would be eliminated.

The mortgage interest deduction — which allows homeowners to deduct interest paid on home loans up to $1.1 million — would still be an option. But the Realtors group and a national home builders’ organization say it would carry far less value; most people would have to file for the standard deduction and many would pay higher taxes.

Why the alarm?

Real estate agents and builders say they’d be losing what they consider an important incentive for homebuyers — the prospect of receiving a mortgage deduction on their taxes. And, they say, getting rid of deductions for state and local taxes would decrease home values.

“Current homeowners could very well see their home’s value plummet and their equity evaporate if tax reform nullifies or eliminates the tax incentives they depend upon, while prospective homebuyers will see that dream pushed further out of reach,” said William E. Brown, NAR’s president. “While we appreciate the administration’s stated commitment to protecting homeownership, this plan does anything but.”

Brown, from Alamo, added, “Common sense says owning a home isn’t the same as renting one, and American’s tax code shouldn’t treat those activities the same either.”

The National Association of Home Builders also sounded a warning.

“Doubling the standard deduction could severely marginalize the mortgage interest deduction, which would reduce housing demand and lead to lower home values,” said Granger MacDonald, the association’s chairman.

How popular is the mortgage interest deduction?

The write-off, enacted in 1913, has been a third rail in U.S. politics. No one ever touches it.

Proposals to eliminate it, turn it into a tax credit or limit it for high-income taxpayers have come and gone.

In 2014, some 32 million homeowners claimed it, saving about $2,173 each, the National Association of Realtors says.

The real estate industry typically makes a strong push to keep the deduction, saying that to do otherwise would price-out would-be buyers and threaten the housing market.

But some economists and academics say the write-off favors the upper-middle class and the wealthy.

Zillow economist Svenja Gudell said she doesn’t believe that a desire to claim the mortgage interest deduction necessarily drives home purchases.

Dennis C. Smith, a Huntington Beach mortgage broker, agrees.

“Having interviewed potential homeowners for 30 years, I can state that very few, about 10-15 percent or less, of those I have spoken to over the years, make their decision to buy a home because of the tax deduction they will receive,” Smith, co-owner of Stratis Financial, recently wrote in his blog.

How could the tax plan affect pricey housing markets?

Getting rid of property tax deductions would hit expensive markets harder than other places, Realtors, economists and academics say.

“For households in higher-tax states, the benefit of itemizing is higher,” states an article entitled “Tax plan could hurt homeowners” published on the national Realtor group’s’ website. “And for second-home owners, the net tax benefit of itemizing can be substantial.”

“There’s a segment of borrowers who would be adversely affected,” said Paul Habibi, a faculty member at the Ziman Center for Real Estate at UCLA. “It just depends on what side of the income spectrum you’re on.”

In coastal markets, including Los Angeles and Orange County, San Francisco and New York City, he said, “You’re going to have a greater percentage of those potential homeowners adversely affected because they have median prices high enough to kick them into benefiting from the (itemized) deductions.”

Under the plan, a married couple would need a home-loan balance of about $608,000 to use the mortgage interest deduction, up from about $322,000 now, Bloomberg reported.

Ralph McLaughlin, an economist at home search website Trulia, does not think the plan, if implemented, would create a major disruption in the overall housing market.

But, he said, “The proposed tax reform will push the benefits of the mortgage interest deduction further out of reach of the middle class. Under the current tax code, the top 43 percent of household earners can itemize their mortgage interest if they purchased a home. Under the proposed tax plan, that number would shrink to just the top 17 percent.”

In Orange County, only 26 percent of households could afford to buy a home with a mortgage high enough to qualify for the mortgage interest tax deduction under the proposed tax plan – down from 55 percent of households that currently qualify, by Trulia’s math.

What’s next?

Despite arguments that Trump’s proposals could help renters and those struggling to become homeowners, Senate Democrats say Trump’s overall plan is aimed at the rich, including the president.

And the nonpartisan Tax Policy Center has said nearly 8 million families – including a majority of single-parent households – would be worse off.

Much still is unknown. The plan has three tax brackets of 10, 25 and 35 percent. But it’s not yet clear what the income levels would be.

And, of course, what Congress would do remains to be seen.

But the plan’s advocates, as well as those who do not see it harming the housing market, predict the savings for most households could actually become a boon to homeownership.

“For many lower and middle-income taxpayers, a higher standard deduction will increase their after-tax income, which could end up boosting home buying demand from these groups if net income rises enough,” said Gudell of Zillow.

“At the end of the day, what really matters is whether people have more or less after-tax money to spend on housing and other living expenses,” she said.

As to those at the higher end who would see no benefit, Smith wrote, “There is an old saying, ‘If you can afford a Ferrari you aren’t worried about the price of gas or an oil change.’

“Similarly, if you can afford a $10 million dollar estate, you aren’t worried about the mortgage interest and property tax deduction.”

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UC Irvine law dean Erwin Chemerinsky named dean of Berkeley’s law school, will begin July 1

  • Erwin Chemerinsky, who is the founding Dean and Distinguished Professor of Law at UCI, teaches one of his classes in 2015. (Michael Goulding, Staff File)

    Erwin Chemerinsky, who is the founding Dean and Distinguished Professor of Law at UCI, teaches one of his classes in 2015. (Michael Goulding, Staff File)

  • Erwin Chemerinsky, who is the founding Dean and Distinguished Professor of Law at UCI, wipes down the classes whiteboard and chats with a student after teaching one of his classes  in 2015. (Michael Goulding, Staff File)

    Erwin Chemerinsky, who is the founding Dean and Distinguished Professor of Law at UCI, wipes down the classes whiteboard and chats with a student after teaching one of his classes in 2015. (Michael Goulding, Staff File)

  • Erwin Chemerinsky, founding dean of UCI Law School, makes a point while discussing "Marriage Redefined in One State or All? The Meaning and Impact of the Supreme Marriage Decisions" at Orange Coast College in Costa Mesa in 2013. (Christine Cotter, Staff File)

    Erwin Chemerinsky, founding dean of UCI Law School, makes a point while discussing “Marriage Redefined in One State or All? The Meaning and Impact of the Supreme Marriage Decisions” at Orange Coast College in Costa Mesa in 2013. (Christine Cotter, Staff File)

  • Erwin Chemerinsky, has a one-on-one discussion with Ronald Park of Irvine after teaching one of his classes in 2015. (Michael Goulding, Staff File)

    Erwin Chemerinsky, has a one-on-one discussion with Ronald Park of Irvine after teaching one of his classes in 2015. (Michael Goulding, Staff File)

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Erwin Chemerinsky, the founding dean of UC Irvine’s School of Law, will become the next dean of UC Berkeley’s law school, ending his nine-year tenure in Orange County during which he has taught courses on the First Amendment, published multiple books and law review articles and argued in front of the U.S. Supreme Court.

Berkeley announced the appointment on Wednesday, May 17. Chemerinsky will begin his five-year term at Berkeley School of Law on July 1.

“Dean Chemerinsky is an acclaimed researcher, gifted teacher, and accomplished administrator,” Carol Christ, interim executive vice chancellor at Berkeley, said in a statement.

“I believe he will be a phenomenal leader for our law school, someone who will ensure that Berkeley Law remains not only a powerhouse of legal scholarship and training, but also a community built on mutual respect and inclusion.”

L. Song Richardson, who has a law degree from Yale University, will become the interim dean when Chemerinsky leaves UCI, that university said in a statement.

Richardson joined the faculty at the UCI law school in 2014, and teaches courses on criminal law, criminal procedure, and law and social science.

“I want to express my enormous gratitude to Dean Erwin Chemerinsky for all he has contributed to the success of the law school and the entire university during his tenure as dean,” said UCI Chancellor Howard Gillman in a statement. “I’m very grateful that Song Richardson has agreed to serve as interim dean, knowing that she will work with the law school community to maintain our extraordinary momentum.”

Richardson – who has also taught at DePaul University, American University and the University of Iowa – said in a statement Wednesday that she is “honored and humbled” to become interim dean and noted Chemerinsky’s role in turning the law school into an “extraordinary” institution.

“Through our collective leadership, I look forward to an exciting future for UCI law and to more continued success,” she said.

The university’s statement did not say when it will begin to search for a permanent dean.

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Committee suggests $90 refund, other ideas, for Yorba Linda Water District customers

Refunding customers $50 to $90 to help restore public trust is among the recommendations an 11-member ad hoc committee is suggesting to the Yorba Linda Water District.

The district’s board thanked committee members for their efforts and discussed the recommendations at its meeting Tuesday night, but no decisions were made.

“We are seriously considering all the recommendations, including the rebate, and we will be in a better position to make a decision once the budget is complete for the next year,” Board President J. Wayne Miller said, adding the five-member board has been in the process of restructuring the district’s debt and financing capital projects, including the new Fairmont Booster Pump Station.

The citizens advisory committee was formed to study the agency’s rate structure after voters in November overhauled the board.

The committee came up with 14 recommendations for the district, including to change to budget-based rates. The committee modeled its suggestion for having individualized water budgets for each home and business after how the Irvine Ranch Water District charges its customers.

“I think it’s a really challenging issue,” board member Andy Hall said about the idea of water budgets for customers. “I don’t want the district to be in the business of policing how many people are living in your home.”

Other recommendations include more transparency, conducting a staffing review and looking at rate-assistance programs for lower-income and fixed-income customers.

Board members did not discuss a timeline on the implementation of any of the recommendations.

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Maternity leave dispute: Wescom settles complaint against Santa Ana couple who sought loan

The Housing and Urban Development department and Wescom Credit Union have resolved allegations the company denied a Santa Ana couple’s mortgage loan application because the wife was on maternity leave.

The couple’s name was redacted from the HUD agreement.

The agreement requires the Pasadena-based credit union refinance the couple’s existing mortgage at a lower rate and create a $50,000 compensation fund for applicants who were similarly denied loans or withdrew mortgage applications from Wescom during 2015.

Refusing to provide a mortgage loan or mortgage insurance because a woman is pregnant or on family leave violates the Fair Housing Act’s prohibition against sex and familial status discrimination, which includes discrimination against individuals who have or are expecting a child.

HUD in a statement said it has received nearly 150 complaints alleging maternity leave discrimination and has obtained more than $8 million in compensation for victims.

“An otherwise qualified borrower should not have their mortgage loan denied or delayed just because they’re having a baby,” said Bryan Greene, HUD’s general deputy assistant secretary for Fair Housing and Equal Opportunity.

The agreement announced Wednesday stems from a complaint that a married couple from Santa Ana filed with HUD. The couple alleged Wescom unfairly denied their mortgage loan and the lender requested the woman return to work and provide a current pay stub before they would approve the loan application.

Wescom denied they were engaged in any of the discriminatory acts alleged in the complaint, according to HUD. The agreement between Wescom and HUD was signed by Charles Thomas, senior vice president of lending at Wescom.

Other terms of the agreement Wescom include:

— Ensure its lending policies regarding parental leave comply with the Fair Housing Act;

— Provide fair lending training to its employees; and

— Send a notice to its employees regarding its parental leave lending policies.

Anyone who believes they have experienced discrimination can file a complaint by contacting HUD’s Office of Fair Housing and Equal Opportunity at 800-669-9777 or 800-927-9275 (TTY). Housing discrimination complaints may also be filed by going to hud.gov/fairhousing, or by downloading HUD’s free housing discrimination mobile application, which can be accessed through Apple and Android devices.

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Freeway pedestrian dies after being struck by van

A man who was struck by a van while lying in the slow lane on the 55 Freeway in Santa Ana early Friday morning, May 5, died in the hospital on Saturday.

The Orange County Coroner’s Office on Sunday identified the man as 30-year-old Oscar Bonilla, of Tustin.

The crash occurred a little after 1:20 a.m. on the northbound
freeway, south of Edinger Avenue, said California Highway Patrol Officer Florentino Olivera.

Bonilla was transported by ambulance to Orange County Global Medical Center in Santa Ana.

The driver of the van remained at the scene and no citations were issued.

Officers are investigating why the man was in the freeway lane, Olivera said. It has not been determined if drugs or alcohol contributed to the incident.

Witnesses reported that Bonilla had been walking against traffic in the slow lane before lying down, Olivera said.

 

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One person dies, another hospitalized after car hits pole in San Clemente

One person died and another was injured after the car they were riding in crashed into a power pole in San Clemente early on Saturday morning, May 6.

The pair was discovered in an overturned Honda Accord on Avenida Vaquero and Camino de los Mares, according to Orange County Sheriff’s deputies. The crash, reported at 12:47 a.m., did not involve any other cars, said sheriff’s Lt. John Roche.

A witness from the scene reported hearing loud engine revving before the car collided but major crash investigators were still trying to confirm if speed, alcohol or other factors contributed to the crash.(Photo by Miles T. Madison, Contributing Photographer)
Investigators were trying to determine if speed, alcohol or other factors contributed to the accident. (Photo by Miles T. Madison, Contributing Photographer)

One person in the car, reportedly the driver, was pronounced dead at the scene by paramedics, and the passenger was taken with injuries to Mission Hospital in Mission Viejo.

The deceased victim’s identity has not yet been released.

A witness from the scene reported hearing loud engine revving before the car collided, but major crash investigators were trying to determine if speed, alcohol or other factors contributed to the crash.

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Rain to shower Orange County over the weekend

Showers are expected to hit Orange County starting Saturday night and will continue into Sunday, according to forecasters.

Saturday began with overcast skies and scattered drizzling. According to the National Weather Service, the day’s high in the inland areas such as Santa Ana and Anaheim will be 65 degrees and cool off into the low-50s in the evening. Coastal areas like Newport Beach are expected to see lower temperatures, a high of 63 and low of 51.

Forecasters also predicted Saturday night wind gusts as strong as 20 mph in some areas. Showers are expected to arrive Sunday with chances of thunderstorms. Temperatures in most areas will be in the mid-60s during the day and low-50s at night with mostly cloudy skies all around.

Rain may linger until early Monday morning but is expected to let up in the afternoon for partly cloudy skies, gradually clearing for a balmy rest of the week.

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‘Star Wars’ Land update: Disneyland’s Rivers of America route nearly done

The steel is climbing out of the ground as “Star Wars” land continues to take shape at Disneyland.

But while that land will open in 2019, crews are rapidly finishing work on the rockwork and landscaping around the new route for the Rivers of America. The waterway is scheduled to be open to boat traffic again in the latter half of 2017, as is the Big Thunder Trail that connects Frontierland to the back side of Fantasyland.

Related to that work, the steam engine of the Disneyland Railroad that has been on display at the Frontierland/New Orleans Square station has been taken back to the Roundhouse. The remaining items on display on the other side of the tracks should be removed by Monday, May 8, as well.

Other refurbishments at Disneyland include the Guided Tours Garden and the Indiana Jones Adventure – Temple of the Forbidden Eye, the latter will reopen by summer.

Over at Disney California Adventure, workers are putting the finishing touches on the new “Guardians of the Galaxy – Mission: Breakout!” attraction that will open to the public by Memorial Day weekend.

Those seeking an extended preview of Disney’s Johnny Depp-starring “Pirates of the Caribbean – Dead Men Tell No Tales,” the fifth movie in the series, can do so at the Sunset Theater near Monsters, Inc.

Disney Junior is still closed, but expected to open with a new show for the summer.

Meanwhile, workers are still pouring the foundation for the Splitsville Luxury Lanes in Downtown Disney.

Click through the slideshow to see more, including some beautiful roses currently blooming at Disney California Adventure.

  • Where there was once a giant hole in the ground, concrete walls have grown in one of the show buildings under construction in “Star Wars” land at Disneyland. The project is so big, it takes two cranes working each day to keep up with the project’s needs. (Photo by Mark Eades, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    Where there was once a giant hole in the ground, concrete walls have grown in one of the show buildings under construction in “Star Wars” land at Disneyland. The project is so big, it takes two cranes working each day to keep up with the project’s needs. (Photo by Mark Eades, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • The scrim hiding the back end of the Rivers of America at Disneyland has been removed, allowing better views of the rock work that will be along the water’s edge when it reopens later in 2017. (Photo by Mark Eades, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    The scrim hiding the back end of the Rivers of America at Disneyland has been removed, allowing better views of the rock work that will be along the water’s edge when it reopens later in 2017. (Photo by Mark Eades, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • A worker drives a raft to Tom Sawyer Island to work on the island, as it is still closed due to construction of “Star Wars” land at Disneyland. The island is expected to open later in 2017. The refurbishment of the Sailing Ship Columbia appears to be complete too. (Photo by Mark Eades, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    A worker drives a raft to Tom Sawyer Island to work on the island, as it is still closed due to construction of “Star Wars” land at Disneyland. The island is expected to open later in 2017. The refurbishment of the Sailing Ship Columbia appears to be complete too. (Photo by Mark Eades, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • This is the mother goose named Suzi at Disneyland. She appears to be keeping an eye on the photographer, or is looking for food for her and her two younglings, which the photographer named Kyleigh and Melissa. (Photo by Mark Eades, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    This is the mother goose named Suzi at Disneyland. She appears to be keeping an eye on the photographer, or is looking for food for her and her two younglings, which the photographer named Kyleigh and Melissa. (Photo by Mark Eades, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • The rigging and masts shine in the sunlight on the Sailing Ship Columbia at Disneyland. The ship looks ready to set sail on the Rivers of America, but for now sits in Fowler’s Harbor. (Photo by Mark Eades, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    The rigging and masts shine in the sunlight on the Sailing Ship Columbia at Disneyland. The ship looks ready to set sail on the Rivers of America, but for now sits in Fowler’s Harbor. (Photo by Mark Eades, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Spotted through a crack in the fence, two workers appear to be building a dock on Tom Sawyer Island while the back part of the Rivers of America remains dry of water during this construction phase related to “Star Wars” land at Disneyland. (Photo by Mark Eades, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    Spotted through a crack in the fence, two workers appear to be building a dock on Tom Sawyer Island while the back part of the Rivers of America remains dry of water during this construction phase related to “Star Wars” land at Disneyland. (Photo by Mark Eades, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Rock work around the Rivers of America is really taking shape at Disneyland as this phase of the “Star Wars” land project nears completion. This area should open up some time in the second half of 2017. (Photo by Mark Eades, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    Rock work around the Rivers of America is really taking shape at Disneyland as this phase of the “Star Wars” land project nears completion. This area should open up some time in the second half of 2017. (Photo by Mark Eades, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Trees planted behind the rock work around the Rivers of America and along the Big Thunder Trail block the views of “Star Wars” land, as was the intention all along. The area along the trail should open up at Disneyland in the second half of 2017. (Photo by Mark Eades, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    Trees planted behind the rock work around the Rivers of America and along the Big Thunder Trail block the views of “Star Wars” land, as was the intention all along. The area along the trail should open up at Disneyland in the second half of 2017. (Photo by Mark Eades, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • This photo, taken through a scrim to block views by guests at Disneyland, is of the rock work and more around the northern section of the re-routed Rivers of America. The water body got a new route to make room for “Star Wars” land. The river is supposed to open to boat traffic some time in the second half of 2017, while the new land opens in 2019. (Photo by Mark Eades, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    This photo, taken through a scrim to block views by guests at Disneyland, is of the rock work and more around the northern section of the re-routed Rivers of America. The water body got a new route to make room for “Star Wars” land. The river is supposed to open to boat traffic some time in the second half of 2017, while the new land opens in 2019. (Photo by Mark Eades, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Two floating barges are covered in tarps on the eastern side of the Rivers of America at Disneyland, probably related to the eventual opening of the river to reach their final destination. (Photo by Mark Eades, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    Two floating barges are covered in tarps on the eastern side of the Rivers of America at Disneyland, probably related to the eventual opening of the river to reach their final destination. (Photo by Mark Eades, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Some of the rock work around the Rivers of America appears to be nearly complete at Disneyland as the area takes shape to be open to visits by people on the river boats, or on the Big Thunder Trail some time in the second half of 2017. (Photo by Mark Eades, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    Some of the rock work around the Rivers of America appears to be nearly complete at Disneyland as the area takes shape to be open to visits by people on the river boats, or on the Big Thunder Trail some time in the second half of 2017. (Photo by Mark Eades, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • The steam engine that has been on display at the Frontierland/New Orleans Square Station of the Disneyland Railroad has been returned to the Roundhouse. The rest of the displays will be closed and removed by Monday, May 8, 2017. All part of the preparations to get the railroad running again some time in the second half of 2017. (Photo by Mark Eades, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    The steam engine that has been on display at the Frontierland/New Orleans Square Station of the Disneyland Railroad has been returned to the Roundhouse. The rest of the displays will be closed and removed by Monday, May 8, 2017. All part of the preparations to get the railroad running again some time in the second half of 2017. (Photo by Mark Eades, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • The original boiler from the #2 engine (the E.P. Ripley) was turned into a display model to explain how steam engines work. It has been on display at the Frontierland/New Orleans Square station for nearly a year while the Disneyland Railroad was closed due to the construction of “Star Wars” land. The display will be closed this weekend, and the display removed by Monday, May 8, 2018. (Photo by Mark Eades, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    The original boiler from the #2 engine (the E.P. Ripley) was turned into a display model to explain how steam engines work. It has been on display at the Frontierland/New Orleans Square station for nearly a year while the Disneyland Railroad was closed due to the construction of “Star Wars” land. The display will be closed this weekend, and the display removed by Monday, May 8, 2018. (Photo by Mark Eades, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • The Guided Tours garden at Disneyland is getting refurbished. Besides the guided tours, this is the starting point for the “Walk in Walt’s Disneyland Footsteps” tour too. (Photo by Mark Eades, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    The Guided Tours garden at Disneyland is getting refurbished. Besides the guided tours, this is the starting point for the “Walk in Walt’s Disneyland Footsteps” tour too. (Photo by Mark Eades, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • While the Guided Tours garden is closed for refurbishment, visitors to Disneyland are directed by this sign to visit Disneyland’s City Hall to sign up for the tour, which does carry an extra charge besides the admission to the park. (Photo by Mark Eades, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    While the Guided Tours garden is closed for refurbishment, visitors to Disneyland are directed by this sign to visit Disneyland’s City Hall to sign up for the tour, which does carry an extra charge besides the admission to the park. (Photo by Mark Eades, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • The Indiana Jones Adventure – Temple of the Forbidden Eye is closed for refurbishment at Disneyland, but will open up in a few weeks. (Photo by Mark Eades, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    The Indiana Jones Adventure – Temple of the Forbidden Eye is closed for refurbishment at Disneyland, but will open up in a few weeks. (Photo by Mark Eades, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Disney Junior, a show for the younger set, is closed and getting retooled into a new show at Disney California Adventure. It is expected to open with the new show by summer 2017. (Photo by Mark Eades, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    Disney Junior, a show for the younger set, is closed and getting retooled into a new show at Disney California Adventure. It is expected to open with the new show by summer 2017. (Photo by Mark Eades, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Seeking a preview of the fifth installment are ye? Well at Disney California Adventure, now showing is a preview of “Pirates of the Caribbean – Dead Men Tell No Tales” in the Sunset Showcase theater in the Hollywood land area of the park. (Photo by Mark Eades, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    Seeking a preview of the fifth installment are ye? Well at Disney California Adventure, now showing is a preview of “Pirates of the Caribbean – Dead Men Tell No Tales” in the Sunset Showcase theater in the Hollywood land area of the park. (Photo by Mark Eades, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • The folks in the entertainment department at Disney California Adventure have installed a new stage near the Monsters, Inc. attraction for its Disney Performing Arts. Here musical groups from a variety of schools perform each month. (Photo by Mark Eades, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    The folks in the entertainment department at Disney California Adventure have installed a new stage near the Monsters, Inc. attraction for its Disney Performing Arts. Here musical groups from a variety of schools perform each month. (Photo by Mark Eades, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • While Disneyland Resort’s custodial staff prides themselves on keeping things clean and removing cobwebs from nearly everywhere, except attractions like the Haunted Mansion, they know better then to touch Spiderman’s web slinging in Disney California Adventure. (Photo by Mark Eades, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    While Disneyland Resort’s custodial staff prides themselves on keeping things clean and removing cobwebs from nearly everywhere, except attractions like the Haunted Mansion, they know better then to touch Spiderman’s web slinging in Disney California Adventure. (Photo by Mark Eades, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • What was the Tower of Terror has pretty much disappeared, but the construction walls are still up around what will be the new Guardians of the Galaxy – Mission: Breakout! attraction in Disney California Adventure. The new attraction is expected to open to the public Memorial Day weekend of 2017. (Photo by Mark Eades, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    What was the Tower of Terror has pretty much disappeared, but the construction walls are still up around what will be the new Guardians of the Galaxy – Mission: Breakout! attraction in Disney California Adventure. The new attraction is expected to open to the public Memorial Day weekend of 2017. (Photo by Mark Eades, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Grizzly River Rapids is once again flowing and getting riders wet after its annual winter/spring refurbishment at Disney California Adventure. (Photo by Mark Eades, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    Grizzly River Rapids is once again flowing and getting riders wet after its annual winter/spring refurbishment at Disney California Adventure. (Photo by Mark Eades, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Some things, like this Prickly Pear cactus, need no refurbishment to show their colors, as this one in the Cars Land area bloomed with bright colors at Disney California Adventure. (Photo by Mark Eades, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    Some things, like this Prickly Pear cactus, need no refurbishment to show their colors, as this one in the Cars Land area bloomed with bright colors at Disney California Adventure. (Photo by Mark Eades, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • These beautiful pink roses are in the view area for World of Color at Disney California Adventure. Their name is Sexy Rexy Rose, or Rosa Floribunda, Sexy Rosa. (Photo by Mark Eades, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    These beautiful pink roses are in the view area for World of Color at Disney California Adventure. Their name is Sexy Rexy Rose, or Rosa Floribunda, Sexy Rosa. (Photo by Mark Eades, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • This planter near the parking lot tram station in Downtown Disney was getting a major overhaul by some of the Disneyland Resorts horticulture staff. (Photo by Mark Eades, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    This planter near the parking lot tram station in Downtown Disney was getting a major overhaul by some of the Disneyland Resorts horticulture staff. (Photo by Mark Eades, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Not much to see where the Splitsville Luxury Lanes is being built. Crews behind the construction are diligently working on the foundations for the building next to the Build A Bear shop in Downtown Disney. (Photo by Mark Eades, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    Not much to see where the Splitsville Luxury Lanes is being built. Crews behind the construction are diligently working on the foundations for the building next to the Build A Bear shop in Downtown Disney. (Photo by Mark Eades, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • The swimming pool at the Grand Californian Hotel & Spa is still closed, but the pool now has water in it as crews work to get it open in time for the 2017 summer season after a major refurbishment. (Photo by Mark Eades, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    The swimming pool at the Grand Californian Hotel & Spa is still closed, but the pool now has water in it as crews work to get it open in time for the 2017 summer season after a major refurbishment. (Photo by Mark Eades, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Trees have been planted along the berm that surrounds the new route for the Rivers of America at Disneyland. Meanwhile, construction continues on the “Star Wars” land project in the foreground, with Big Thunder Mountain rising in the distance above the trees. (Photo by Mark Eades, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    Trees have been planted along the berm that surrounds the new route for the Rivers of America at Disneyland. Meanwhile, construction continues on the “Star Wars” land project in the foreground, with Big Thunder Mountain rising in the distance above the trees. (Photo by Mark Eades, Orange County Register/SCNG)

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